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CTS (Carpal Tunnel Syndrome)

Dr. David King
(@dr-k)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

Remember not to treat the diagnosis until you have confirmed the involved nerve(s) with a good examination.  Many times the diagnosis of CTS is given when the primary nerve affected is the ulnar nerve.  That being said simply treat the median nerve and/or other nerves found to be involved–I commonly find ulnar nerve involvement–just as demonstrated in the videos.

Another consideration is lower cervical and upper thoracic spine involvement.  I find properly timed and applied adjustments to the appropriate vertebral levels have a beneficial impact in CTS patients.

Two of these modalities together have been shown to reverse the signs and symptoms of CTS–including thenar wasting–in our practice.


   
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Greg Scrace
(@dr-greg-scrace)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 9
 

Hi Dr. King. Upper thoracic spine? Why and how?


   
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Belinda Glen
(@dr-belinda-glen)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 9
 

Mmm, Greg, I’ve found ‘thoracic outlet’ type symptoms combined with carpal tunnel often responds to cercicothoracic adjustments. 

But I look forward to Dr. King’s response.


   
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Dr. David King
(@dr-k)
New Member Forum User
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

Why upper TSP?  I see it’s dysfunction in this patient population.   Possibly for the reason Belinda mentions.

Why does it have an impact? I would think there are a number of hypothesis we can consider.

  • T1 joint dysfunction impacts the T1 root which impacts the brachial plexus thus impacting all neural tissues in the plexus.
  • T1 joint dysfunction impacts cervical spine kinematics thus potentially impacting the nerve roots directly related to the median nerve.
  • Adverse mechanical tension on T1 nerve root may have a reaching impact on mechanical tension in the other nerve roots and thus and impact on their neurological function.

Not an exhaustive list by any means but definitely food for thought.


   
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(@dr-kirby)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 5
 

There’s some collateral t-spine supply to the upper arm. It was my saving grace when brachial plexopathy took out most of the muscles on my dominant hand.


   
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