Research – Algiamed Technologies
White Papers, Clinical Trials and Case Reports
White Papers, Clinical Trials
and Case Reports

Introduction to PRF Research

Algiamed’s electromagnetic therapies utilize oscillating pulses in the radiofrequency spectrum, finding application in the treatment of osteogenesis, neurologically-related diseases and immune disorders.

Using non-invasive, cutting-edge technologies, Algiamed can deliver electromagnetic therapies which are targeted and well-tolerated.

The fast action and long-lasting effects of Algiamed’s electromagnetic therapies capitalize on the solid-state physics structures associated with bio-electronics. This cable-like conduction model delivers targeted electromagnetic fields along the nerves at a speed which is significantly faster than the conventional ionic flow model (i.e., action potentials).

The innovative action of Algiamed’s electromagnetic therapies on biological processes is best defined by the quantum interactions inside the body between our patented waveform and charged biological particles such as ions, atoms, and molecules.

Chronic and acute disorders are characterized by a change in the natural functionality of biological processes and are most often caused by a defect in mitochondrial genetic signaling leading to faults during cellular replication.

In the treatment of neuropathy, Algiamed’s goal is to identify the faults in the biological cascade that lead to pathological states. The treatment consists of applying an electromagnetic field aimed at correcting the biological cascade thus targeting the root cause of a patient’s neurologically-related disease. The ideal result leads to a long-lasting restoration of the intra-neural communication pathways and the natural nerve functionality.

Introduction to PRF Research

Algiamed’s electromagnetic therapies utilize oscillating pulses in the radiofrequency spectrum, finding application in the treatment of osteogenesis, neurologically-related diseases and immune disorders.

Using non-invasive, cutting-edge technologies, Algiamed can deliver electromagnetic therapies which are targeted and well-tolerated.

The fast action and long-lasting effects of Algiamed’s electromagnetic therapies capitalize on the solid-state physics structures associated with bio-electronics. This cable-like conduction model delivers targeted electromagnetic fields along the nerves at a speed which is significantly faster than the conventional ionic flow model (i.e., action potentials).

The innovative action of Algiamed’s electromagnetic therapies on biological processes is best defined by the quantum interactions inside the body between our patented waveform and charged biological particles such as ions, atoms, and molecules.

Chronic and acute disorders are characterized by a change in the natural functionality of biological processes and are most often caused by a defect in mitochondrial genetic signaling leading to faults during cellular replication.

In the treatment of neuropathy, Algiamed’s goal is to identify the faults in the biological cascade that lead to pathological states. The treatment consists of applying an electromagnetic field aimed at correcting the biological cascade thus targeting the root cause of a patient’s neurologically-related disease. The ideal result leads to a long-lasting restoration of the intra-neural communication pathways and the natural nerve functionality.

White Papers

White Papers

Video introduction to our first white paper

Quantum Biology and Healthcare: the Synergistic Bioeffect of Weak Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) on Human Bodies

F. Marsili

Research Department, Algiamed Technologies, 2025 Willingdon Avenue #900, Burnaby BC, V5C 0J3, Canada

Abstract

Human bodies are constantly exposed to environmental electromagnetic sources. Both electric and magnetic fields are known to have an active role in altering biological activities. In the present report, the focus will be exclusively on investigating the role of physiological exposure to magnetism. While strong magnetic fields (MFs) are known to induce potentially harmful thermal effects on living systems, there is no existing evidence suggesting possible negative side effects on biological systems from exposure to low-intensity magnetic fields. In recent years, the fast-growing field of quantum biology has focused on characterizing the complex interactions initiated by weak magnetic fields on human bodies through the laws of quantum physics. Even though there is still little understanding of the exact mechanisms, there is sufficient evidence demonstrating short- and long-term physiological changes elicited and, possibly controlled, by magnetic sources. This paper presents a summary of the mechanisms that are potentially, and possibly mutually, involved in eliciting biological reactions to magnetic exposure, supported by experimental evidence. The current understanding of human electromagnetic exposure suggests a potential future role of electromagnetic therapies as non-invasive, effective, and well-tolerated treatments for chronic and acute illnesses.

Download the White Paper (PDF)

Video introduction to our first white paper

Quantum Biology and Healthcare: the Synergistic Bioeffect of Weak Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) on Human Bodies

F. Marsili

Research Department, Algiamed Technologies, 2025 Willingdon Avenue #900, Burnaby BC, V5C 0J3, Canada

Abstract

Human bodies are constantly exposed to environmental electromagnetic sources. Both electric and magnetic fields are known to have an active role in altering biological activities. In the present report, the focus will be exclusively on investigating the role of physiological exposure to magnetism. While strong magnetic fields (MFs) are known to induce potentially harmful thermal effects on living systems, there is no existing evidence suggesting possible negative side effects on biological systems from exposure to low-intensity magnetic fields. In recent years, the fast-growing field of quantum biology has focused on characterizing the complex interactions initiated by weak magnetic fields on human bodies through the laws of quantum physics. Even though there is still little understanding of the exact mechanisms, there is sufficient evidence demonstrating short- and long-term physiological changes elicited and, possibly controlled, by magnetic sources. This paper presents a summary of the mechanisms that are potentially, and possibly mutually, involved in eliciting biological reactions to magnetic exposure, supported by experimental evidence. The current understanding of human electromagnetic exposure suggests a potential future role of electromagnetic therapies as non-invasive, effective, and well-tolerated treatments for chronic and acute illnesses.

Download the White Paper (PDF)

Clinical Trials

Clinical Trials

For decades, electromagnetic therapies have shown clinical effectiveness in treating neurologically-related diseases, wound healing, and bone repair. In this section, we present the clinical trials and pilot studies thus far conducted using Stimpod NMS460 for the treatment of diabetic neuropathies, intractable pain, and migraine.

Study of the outcome of patients undergoing pulsed radiofrequency for the treatment
of Trigeminal Neuralgia: An observational study.

Neha Shanna, Iqra Nazir Naqash, Zulfiqar Ali, Nadeem Ahmad Khan, Ravouf P Asimi, Imtiyaz A Naqash,
AltafU Ramzan.

Abstract

Background: Trigeminal neuralgia is chracterised as sudden unilateral severe, stabbing, recurrent episodes of pain in the distribution of one or more branches of
the trigeminal nerve. Pulsed radiofrequency stimulation (PRF) has been recently introduced to alleviate neural, joint pain, and muscle pain. We tried to use PRF for pain relief in trigeminal neuralgia. The primary objective of our study was to observe the effectiveness and safety of pulsed radiofrequency in the patients of trigeminal neuralgia who are refractory to medical management. The secondary objective was to study the effect of pulsed radiofrequency on the duration of pain relief in these patients.

Methodolgy: In this observational study, we enrolled all fresh patients with trigeminal neuralgia attending our pain clinic for the first time and those who had not responded to conservative medical treatment or interventional nerve blocks. All the patients were diagnosed on the basis of signs, symptoms and MRI (CISS sequence). Anatomical landmarks of ophthalarnic nerve, maxillary nerve, mandibular nerve were identified and nerve stimulation was done by placing the probe in the affected nerve division. Each point was stimulated with the radiofrequency probe kept for 10 minutes, giving a current of 10 to 30 milli-amperes with a set frequency of 2 Hertz. A total of 10 settings were given on alternate days. Assessment of pain relief, improvement, or deterioration was done using Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score and Brief Pain Inventory facial scale scoring.

Results: There was a significant reduction in pain scores observed on Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) pain intensity score (p value of <0.05) before and after pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application. The duration of pain relief after the application of PRF was up to 180 days in 15 patients, 181-300 days in 8 patients and 300 to 600 days in 7 patients. Only 2 patients had a prolonged pain relief lasting
for 601-720 days. One patient had developed exposure keratitis after 4 sittings of pulsed radiofrequency application at the supraorbital foramen.

Conclusion: PRF offers short term relief in a majority of patients for a period of 18 months to 24 months. However, it was found that the long term effects of PRF may not be seen in patients with TN. PRF may be used as a short term measure for alleviating severe pain of TN till neurolytic
blocks or a definitive surgery is carried out.

View complete study

Noninvasive neuromodulation of supraorbital and occipital nerves as an adjunct to management of chronic headache

Nazia Tauheed1, Aftab Hussain1, Hira Afzal1, Lubna Zafar2, Hammad Usmani1

1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College and Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College and Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract

Background: Chronic daily headache (CDH) results in significant distress and a substantial impact on the quality of life. Due to its nature of refractoriness to conservative management, exploring other modalities seems worthwhile. Invasive nerve stimulation, though promising, has seen complication rates in plenty. The goal of the present study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive neuromodulation of supraorbital and occipital nerves (SON and ON) using hybrid pulsed radiofrequency device (Stimpod NMS460) in patients of CDH.

Methods: Thirty patients suffering from CDH were enrolled in this randomized double‑blind sham‑controlled trial and randomly allocated to two groups of 15 patients each. SON and ON stimulations were given using the device Stimpod NMS460 thrice a week for 3 weeks. Follow‑up visits were scheduled at 6 and 12 weeks of therapy. Pain relief was measured using numerical rating scale score. The overall change in quality of life (measured by Short Form‑12 Health Survey) and associated complications were also noted.

Results: Successful stimulation (50% or greater decrease in pain intensity) was seen in 66.67% patients; inadequate response in 33.3% in the intervention group. The 50% responder rate in sham control group was 13.3%; remaining 86.6% showed an inadequate response. This response remained sustained up to 12 weeks of follow‑up. Similar changes were observed in the quality of life of patients. No adverse effect was documented during the study period.

Conclusion: Noninvasive neuromodulation may serve as a safer and cost‑effective treatment option in CDH refractory to conservative management.

View the complete study

Can an electrical pulsed radiofrequency device relieve pain and improve function in patients with pedal diabetic neuropathy? A single-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial.

P. Berger1, S. Landaux2

1University of the Witwatersrand (Faculty of Health Sciences)
2Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology (CDE) Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Can an electrical pulsed radiofrequency device relieve pain and improve function in patients with pedal diabetic neuropathy? A single-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.

Aim: A randomised single-blind placebo study was conducted on 80 patients with pedal diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 2 cities and their surrounds in South Africa to determine if a pulsed radiofrequency current (PRF) can produce changes in the primary outcome of the DN4 Test and possibly in the BPI-short form.

Method: Patients were selected by their physicians at Centres for Diabetes and randomised into 2 groups – 40 patients each in the groups (A=Active, B =Placebo). Inclusion criteria were pedal Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy and having a score of 4 or 4+/10 in the DN4 Test. Exclusion criteria: previous experience with the pulsed radiofrequency current and having: peripheral or spinal cord stimulator, pacemaker, metal implants and pregnancy. The DN4 was the primary objective and BPI-SF (secondary) was also tested at baseline, after 3 treatments and 3 follow-ups at 1, 3 and 6 months. Each patient had 3 treatments or a placebo once weekly for 10 mins bilaterally at the sciatic nerve in the popliteal fossa.

Results: Data were analysed using the SAS version (9.4 statistical program). Results are expressed as mean and standard deviation by groups (A=Active, B=Placebo). There were differences for age and gender in these 2 groups (Age, p=0.030, gender p=0.01) and adjustments were made where applicable. There were also differences evident regardless of age and gender. The DN4 demonstrated that between baseline and 3 treatments there was a reduction in pain and symptoms greater for the A group: p= 0.010 regardless of age and gender. Between baseline and 1 month there was a reduction in pain in both groups, but no significant difference between them p=0.10 but gender and age, nearly significant. There were no differences at 3 and 6 months. In the BPI-SF there were differences between the active and placebo groups in the worst, average and present pain with positive p values some with adjustment for age and gender.

For relations with other people, there was evidence of significant changes some regardless and some adjusted for age and gender and also relations with other people and without analgesics at baseline. There were no differences even after adjustments for age and gender for work and walking ability. None of the BPI-SF variables showed any differences when adjusting for baseline and or analgesics.

Methods

We applied External (transcutaneous) Stimulation to 35 eligible patients complaining of peripheral neuropathic pain. The procedure entailed the application of a 2Hz frequency and amplitude between 1mA and 15mA electrical stimulus (Neurotrace III, predecessor to NMS460) transcutaneously to a targeted area or nerve supplying the area of intractable pain. The duration of stimulation was 5 minutes in each case and pain scores (VAS) were recorded at 0 and 5 minutes.

Conclusion

After three treatments of PRF current, the DN4 Test demonstrates significant improvements in neuropathic pain and symptoms in certain patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

External stimulation: simplistic solution to intractable pain

T. Goroszeniuk, S. Kothari
Pain Management Centre, Guy’s & St. Thomas’ Hospitals, London. SE1 7EH. UK

Introduction

Despite adopting a multidisciplinary approach, the management of neuropathic pain not infrequently presents a challenging clinical conundrum. Primary afferent stimulation for the control of chronic pain has been used widely during the last 40 years.

Current locations of access for stimulation include skin in Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) and acupuncture, peripheral nerve trunks, and primary afferent collaterals in the dorsal columns during Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS). We have successfully investigated short external low-frequency stimulation either targetted at the site of the maximum pain or deeper afferent sensory nerves in patients with intractable painWe present the preliminary results of our study aimed at symptomatic relief and restoring function in patients with chronic, intractable pain.

Methods

We applied External (transcutaneous) Stimulation to 35 eligible patients complaining of peripheral neuropathic pain. The procedure entailed the application of a 2Hz frequency and amplitude between 1mA and 15mA electrical stimulus (Neurotrace III, predecessor to NMS460) transcutaneously to a targeted area or nerve supplying the area of intractable pain. The duration of stimulation was 5 minutes in each case and pain scores (VAS) were recorded at 0 and 5 minutes.

Results

We noticed a dramatic reduction of the pain VAS. In 19 cases the VAS reduced to 0 at the end of 5 minutes demonstrating a 100% improvement in their pain status. The VAS scores decreased by 90% in four, 63% in another four and 50% in four more patients. The remaining three cases had their VAS score reduce by 25%, 20% and 15% respectively. In four patients with CRPS, vascular changes were observed at end of the procedure.

Conclusion

External stimulation is a noninvasive, simple and effective initial indicator, in patients with neuropathic pain, prior to longer, medium-term percutaneous stimulating catheter trial and subsequent implantation of permanent devices. The external application component allows the procedure to be performed on an outpatient basis and may be considered for diagnostic and repetitive therapeutic procedures. Further investigation is needed to establish a place for this technique in the management of chronic pain.

References:

  1. Alo K M., Holsheimer J., New trends in neuromodulation for the management of neuropathic pain. Neurosurgery, 2002, 4,690-704.
  2. Goroszeniuk T., Goroszeniuk D., Short neuromodulation trial in neuropathic pain produces varying duration but reproducible pain relief. Pain in Europe IV. 4th Congress of EFIC, Prague, 2-6.09.2003.

For decades, electromagnetic therapies have shown clinical effectiveness in treating neurologically-related diseases, wound healing, and bone repair. In this section, we present the clinical trials and pilot studies thus far conducted using Stimpod NMS460 for the treatment of diabetic neuropathies, intractable pain, and migraine.

Study of the outcome of patients undergoing pulsed radiofrequency for the treatment
of Trigeminal Neuralgia: An observational study.

Neha Shanna, Iqra Nazir Naqash, Zulfiqar Ali, Nadeem Ahmad Khan, Ravouf P Asimi, Imtiyaz A Naqash,
AltafU Ramzan.

Abstract

Background: Trigeminal neuralgia is chracterised as sudden unilateral severe, stabbing, recurrent episodes of pain in the distribution of one or more branches of
the trigeminal nerve. Pulsed radiofrequency stimulation (PRF) has been recently introduced to alleviate neural, joint pain, and muscle pain. We tried to use PRF for pain relief in trigeminal neuralgia. The primary objective of our study was to observe the effectiveness and safety of pulsed radiofrequency in the patients of trigeminal neuralgia who are refractory to medical management. The secondary objective was to study the effect of pulsed radiofrequency on the duration of pain relief in these patients.

Methodolgy: In this observational study, we enrolled all fresh patients with trigeminal neuralgia attending our pain clinic for the first time and those who had not responded to conservative medical treatment or interventional nerve blocks. All the patients were diagnosed on the basis of signs, symptoms and MRI (CISS sequence). Anatomical landmarks of ophthalarnic nerve, maxillary nerve, mandibular nerve were identified and nerve stimulation was done by placing the probe in the affected nerve division. Each point was stimulated with the radiofrequency probe kept for 10 minutes, giving a current of 10 to 30 milli-amperes with a set frequency of 2 Hertz. A total of 10 settings were given on alternate days. Assessment of pain relief, improvement, or deterioration was done using Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score and Brief Pain Inventory facial scale scoring.

Results: There was a significant reduction in pain scores observed on Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) pain intensity score (p value of <0.05) before and after pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application. The duration of pain relief after the application of PRF was up to 180 days in 15 patients, 181-300 days in 8 patients and 300 to 600 days in 7 patients. Only 2 patients had a prolonged pain relief lasting
for 601-720 days. One patient had developed exposure keratitis after 4 sittings of pulsed radiofrequency application at the supraorbital foramen.

Conclusion: PRF offers short term relief in a majority of patients for a period of 18 months to 24 months. However, it was found that the long term effects of PRF may not be seen in patients with TN. PRF may be used as a short term measure for alleviating severe pain of TN till neurolytic
blocks or a definitive surgery is carried out.

View complete study

Noninvasive neuromodulation of supraorbital and occipital nerves as an adjunct to management of chronic headache

Nazia Tauheed1, Aftab Hussain1, Hira Afzal1, Lubna Zafar2, Hammad Usmani1

1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College and Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College and Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract

Background: Chronic daily headache (CDH) results in significant distress and a substantial impact on the quality of life. Due to its nature of refractoriness to conservative management, exploring other modalities seems worthwhile. Invasive nerve stimulation, though promising, has seen complication rates in plenty. The goal of the present study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive neuromodulation of supraorbital and occipital nerves (SON and ON) using hybrid pulsed radiofrequency device (Stimpod NMS460) in patients of CDH.

Methods: Thirty patients suffering from CDH were enrolled in this randomized double‑blind sham‑controlled trial and randomly allocated to two groups of 15 patients each. SON and ON stimulations were given using the device Stimpod NMS460 thrice a week for 3 weeks. Follow‑up visits were scheduled at 6 and 12 weeks of therapy. Pain relief was measured using numerical rating scale score. The overall change in quality of life (measured by Short Form‑12 Health Survey) and associated complications were also noted.

Results: Successful stimulation (50% or greater decrease in pain intensity) was seen in 66.67% patients; inadequate response in 33.3% in the intervention group. The 50% responder rate in sham control group was 13.3%; remaining 86.6% showed an inadequate response. This response remained sustained up to 12 weeks of follow‑up. Similar changes were observed in the quality of life of patients. No adverse effect was documented during the study period.

Conclusion: Noninvasive neuromodulation may serve as a safer and cost‑effective treatment option in CDH refractory to conservative management.

View the complete study

Can an electrical pulsed radiofrequency device relieve pain and improve function in patients with pedal diabetic neuropathy? A single-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial.

P. Berger1, S. Landaux2

1University of the Witwatersrand (Faculty of Health Sciences)
2Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology (CDE) Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Can an electrical pulsed radiofrequency device relieve pain and improve function in patients with pedal diabetic neuropathy? A single-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.

Aim: A randomised single-blind placebo study was conducted on 80 patients with pedal diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 2 cities and their surrounds in South Africa to determine if a pulsed radiofrequency current (PRF) can produce changes in the primary outcome of the DN4 Test and possibly in the BPI-short form.

Method: Patients were selected by their physicians at Centres for Diabetes and randomised into 2 groups – 40 patients each in the groups (A=Active, B =Placebo). Inclusion criteria were pedal Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy and having a score of 4 or 4+/10 in the DN4 Test. Exclusion criteria: previous experience with the pulsed radiofrequency current and having: peripheral or spinal cord stimulator, pacemaker, metal implants and pregnancy. The DN4 was the primary objective and BPI-SF (secondary) was also tested at baseline, after 3 treatments and 3 follow-ups at 1, 3 and 6 months. Each patient had 3 treatments or a placebo once weekly for 10 mins bilaterally at the sciatic nerve in the popliteal fossa.

Results: Data were analysed using the SAS version (9.4 statistical program). Results are expressed as mean and standard deviation by groups (A=Active, B=Placebo). There were differences for age and gender in these 2 groups (Age, p=0.030, gender p=0.01) and adjustments were made where applicable. There were also differences evident regardless of age and gender. The DN4 demonstrated that between baseline and 3 treatments there was a reduction in pain and symptoms greater for the A group: p= 0.010 regardless of age and gender. Between baseline and 1 month there was a reduction in pain in both groups, but no significant difference between them p=0.10 but gender and age, nearly significant. There were no differences at 3 and 6 months. In the BPI-SF there were differences between the active and placebo groups in the worst, average and present pain with positive p values some with adjustment for age and gender.

For relations with other people, there was evidence of significant changes some regardless and some adjusted for age and gender and also relations with other people and without analgesics at baseline. There were no differences even after adjustments for age and gender for work and walking ability. None of the BPI-SF variables showed any differences when adjusting for baseline and or analgesics.

Methods

We applied External (transcutaneous) Stimulation to 35 eligible patients complaining of peripheral neuropathic pain. The procedure entailed the application of a 2Hz frequency and amplitude between 1mA and 15mA electrical stimulus (Neurotrace III, predecessor to NMS460) transcutaneously to a targeted area or nerve supplying the area of intractable pain. The duration of stimulation was 5 minutes in each case and pain scores (VAS) were recorded at 0 and 5 minutes.

Conclusion

After three treatments of PRF current, the DN4 Test demonstrates significant improvements in neuropathic pain and symptoms in certain patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

External stimulation: simplistic solution to intractable pain

T. Goroszeniuk, S. Kothari
Pain Management Centre, Guy’s & St. Thomas’ Hospitals, London. SE1 7EH. UK

Introduction

Despite adopting a multidisciplinary approach, the management of neuropathic pain not infrequently presents a challenging clinical conundrum. Primary afferent stimulation for the control of chronic pain has been used widely during the last 40 years.

Current locations of access for stimulation include skin in Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) and acupuncture, peripheral nerve trunks, and primary afferent collaterals in the dorsal columns during Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS). We have successfully investigated short external low-frequency stimulation either targetted at the site of the maximum pain or deeper afferent sensory nerves in patients with intractable painWe present the preliminary results of our study aimed at symptomatic relief and restoring function in patients with chronic, intractable pain.

Methods

We applied External (transcutaneous) Stimulation to 35 eligible patients complaining of peripheral neuropathic pain. The procedure entailed the application of a 2Hz frequency and amplitude between 1mA and 15mA electrical stimulus (Neurotrace III, predecessor to NMS460) transcutaneously to a targeted area or nerve supplying the area of intractable pain. The duration of stimulation was 5 minutes in each case and pain scores (VAS) were recorded at 0 and 5 minutes.

Results

We noticed a dramatic reduction of the pain VAS. In 19 cases the VAS reduced to 0 at the end of 5 minutes demonstrating a 100% improvement in their pain status. The VAS scores decreased by 90% in four, 63% in another four and 50% in four more patients. The remaining three cases had their VAS score reduce by 25%, 20% and 15% respectively. In four patients with CRPS, vascular changes were observed at end of the procedure.

Conclusion

External stimulation is a noninvasive, simple and effective initial indicator, in patients with neuropathic pain, prior to longer, medium-term percutaneous stimulating catheter trial and subsequent implantation of permanent devices. The external application component allows the procedure to be performed on an outpatient basis and may be considered for diagnostic and repetitive therapeutic procedures. Further investigation is needed to establish a place for this technique in the management of chronic pain.

References:

  1. Alo K M., Holsheimer J., New trends in neuromodulation for the management of neuropathic pain. Neurosurgery, 2002, 4,690-704.
  2. Goroszeniuk T., Goroszeniuk D., Short neuromodulation trial in neuropathic pain produces varying duration but reproducible pain relief. Pain in Europe IV. 4th Congress of EFIC, Prague, 2-6.09.2003.

Case Reports

Case Reports

The reports listed in this section has shown such dramatic impact that practitioners using the Stimpod NMS460 felt compelled to share the results with us.  

Electrical current and acupuncture treatment for a paediatric patient with recurring long thoracic nerve paralysis

By Prof. Phyllis Berger

Abstract

A female paediatric patient aged 9 years presented with right long thoracic nerve palsy for the second time. The first injury that occurred in 2011 was due to a fall and although the patient had a paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle and was unable to elevate the arm, with rehabilitation and conventional physiotherapy, she recovered completely according to the nerve conduction test that was conducted six months post-recovery.

The second injury to the long thoracic nerve was due to a ballet movement that occurred in 2012. Besides the nerve palsy that reoccurred, there was also a complication of severe pain and evidence of a complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). The second injury was limited by the inability to participate in rehabilitation exercises and physiotherapy due to pain and hyperaesthesia in the distribution of C5 and C6 dermatome both in the trapezius and shoulder region. The third nerve conduction test deteriorated to those recorded after the first nerve conduction test.

A different physiotherapy approach was then applied – initially to reduce pain and decrease hyperaesthesia and then to attempt to increase nerve conduction by the inclusion of an electrical device that simultaneously delivers both a low and a high-frequency current. This treatment was combined with various pain resolving tactics including acupuncture, individual sub-liminal, low and high-frequency electrical currents. Several interventions were applied to tailor the treatment to the patient to achieve maximal improvement in pain and mobility. It is therefore difficult to attribute improvement to one particular modality or even natural resolution of the condition however previous clinical application and experience of activating nerve conduction with the combination current in other conditions implied that improvement could be expected. This particular electrical current is a combination of a low frequency and a magnetic field.

The condition resolved completely with full movement and no pain after 13 treatments over two months – it was evident that the combination of treatment had an effect on expediting the healing in the nerve. The patient was able to resume all her normal activities including gymnastics and ballet.

Read the full case report

Report on a case series investigating a neurostimulation device for the treatment of pain and improvement of mobility and function following elbow surgery

Prof. Phyllis Berger & Jaye Jacks

Abstract

A group of seven patients received neurostimulation (Stimpod) post-tennis or golfer’s elbow surgery as their sole treatment to relieve acute post-operative pain, improve mobility and function. Patients undergoing the above-mentioned surgery have had chronic pain with and without neuropathic symptoms for a prolonged period. There is usually severe injury with active inflammatory processes due to the surgery. It was thought that treating these patients aggressively early post-operatively may expedite pain relief and the healing process.

Method

After their surgery, seven patients were given neurostimulation for three treatments of 20 min each on the brachial plexus during the 10 days before the splint was removed. This was followed by 6 treatments, twice weekly of 20 min each after the splint was removed. At each of these treatments 5-min stimulation were administered to four areas: the nerve supply (1) superior and (2) inferior to the elbow and (3 and 4) on either end of the wound. Patients were evaluated for pain with the visual analogue scale, movements of flexion and extension measured with a goniometer, strength and flexibility with a 12-movement activity scale, status of the wound and satisfaction with treatment, mobility and function. These measures were re-evaluated telephonically at one, three and six months after the last treatment.

Results

Significant pain relief was achieved by all of the seven patients before the splint was removed at the 4th treatment. Pain relief, range of movement and function was greatly improved at the final (9th) treatment by six of the seven patients and this was maintained with nearly full improvement of the above parameters for most of the participants at one month after the last treatment. Two patients had to have re-operation due to requiring more extensive surgery in the one patient and falling and injuring the original surgical site in the other patient. At three and six months after the last treatment full improvement in all the parameters above was maintained in the remaining five patients who also had excellent wound healing and satisfaction with their treatment, mobility and function.

Conclusion

It appears that the neurostimulation (Stimpod) has the capacity to improve acute post-surgical pain and reduce pain, improve mobility, function and stimulate wound healing once the splint was removed. This treatment is relatively cost effective, is non-invasive and of short duration. Positive effects were all maintained at 6 months.

Read the full case report

 

The reports listed in this section has shown such dramatic impact that practitioners using the Stimpod NMS460 felt compelled to share the results with us.  

Electrical current and acupuncture treatment for a paediatric patient with recurring long thoracic nerve paralysis

By Prof. Phyllis Berger

Abstract

A female paediatric patient aged 9 years presented with right long thoracic nerve palsy for the second time. The first injury that occurred in 2011 was due to a fall and although the patient had a paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle and was unable to elevate the arm, with rehabilitation and conventional physiotherapy, she recovered completely according to the nerve conduction test that was conducted six months post-recovery.

The second injury to the long thoracic nerve was due to a ballet movement that occurred in 2012. Besides the nerve palsy that reoccurred, there was also a complication of severe pain and evidence of a complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). The second injury was limited by the inability to participate in rehabilitation exercises and physiotherapy due to pain and hyperaesthesia in the distribution of C5 and C6 dermatome both in the trapezius and shoulder region. The third nerve conduction test deteriorated to those recorded after the first nerve conduction test.

A different physiotherapy approach was then applied – initially to reduce pain and decrease hyperaesthesia and then to attempt to increase nerve conduction by the inclusion of an electrical device that simultaneously delivers both a low and a high-frequency current. This treatment was combined with various pain resolving tactics including acupuncture, individual sub-liminal, low and high-frequency electrical currents. Several interventions were applied to tailor the treatment to the patient to achieve maximal improvement in pain and mobility. It is therefore difficult to attribute improvement to one particular modality or even natural resolution of the condition however previous clinical application and experience of activating nerve conduction with the combination current in other conditions implied that improvement could be expected. This particular electrical current is a combination of a low frequency and a magnetic field.

The condition resolved completely with full movement and no pain after 13 treatments over two months – it was evident that the combination of treatment had an effect on expediting the healing in the nerve. The patient was able to resume all her normal activities including gymnastics and ballet.

Read the full case report

Report on a case series investigating a neurostimulation device for the treatment of pain and improvement of mobility and function following elbow surgery

Prof. Phyllis Berger & Jaye Jacks

Abstract

A group of seven patients received neurostimulation (Stimpod) post-tennis or golfer’s elbow surgery as their sole treatment to relieve acute post-operative pain, improve mobility and function. Patients undergoing the above-mentioned surgery have had chronic pain with and without neuropathic symptoms for a prolonged period. There is usually severe injury with active inflammatory processes due to the surgery. It was thought that treating these patients aggressively early post-operatively may expedite pain relief and the healing process.

Method

After their surgery, seven patients were given neurostimulation for three treatments of 20 min each on the brachial plexus during the 10 days before the splint was removed. This was followed by 6 treatments, twice weekly of 20 min each after the splint was removed. At each of these treatments 5-min stimulation were administered to four areas: the nerve supply (1) superior and (2) inferior to the elbow and (3 and 4) on either end of the wound. Patients were evaluated for pain with the visual analogue scale, movements of flexion and extension measured with a goniometer, strength and flexibility with a 12-movement activity scale, status of the wound and satisfaction with treatment, mobility and function. These measures were re-evaluated telephonically at one, three and six months after the last treatment.

Results

Significant pain relief was achieved by all of the seven patients before the splint was removed at the 4th treatment. Pain relief, range of movement and function was greatly improved at the final (9th) treatment by six of the seven patients and this was maintained with nearly full improvement of the above parameters for most of the participants at one month after the last treatment. Two patients had to have re-operation due to requiring more extensive surgery in the one patient and falling and injuring the original surgical site in the other patient. At three and six months after the last treatment full improvement in all the parameters above was maintained in the remaining five patients who also had excellent wound healing and satisfaction with their treatment, mobility and function.

Conclusion

It appears that the neurostimulation (Stimpod) has the capacity to improve acute post-surgical pain and reduce pain, improve mobility, function and stimulate wound healing once the splint was removed. This treatment is relatively cost effective, is non-invasive and of short duration. Positive effects were all maintained at 6 months.

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Literature Review

Literature Review

A selection of peer-reviewed scientific studies and clinical trials related to our technology and research.

A selection of peer-reviewed scientific studies and clinical trials related to our technology and research.